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External Reviews. Metacritic Reviews. Photo Gallery. Trailers and Videos. Crazy Credits. Alternate Versions. Rate This. A Uruguayan rugby team stranded in the snow swept Andes are forced to use desperate measures to survive after a plane crash. Director: Frank Marshall. Added to Watchlist. From metacritic. Black Hollywood Icons. Celebrate Black History Month. Maribel et Sylvain. Movies That Make Me Cry. Share this Rating Title: Alive 7. Use the HTML below. You must be a registered user to use the IMDb rating plugin.

User Polls March Madness. Mountain Coldest movie ever? Nominated for 1 Primetime Emmy. Edit Cast Cast overview, first billed only: Ethan Hawke Nando Parrado Vincent Spano Antonio Balbi Josh Hamilton Roberto Canessa Bruce Ramsay Gustavo Zerbino Kevin Breznahan Roy Harley Sam Behrens Javier Methol Illeana Douglas Lilliana Methol Jack Noseworthy Federico Aranda Jake Carpenter Alberto Artuna Michael DeLorenzo Fraga, the Mechanic Danny Nucci Edit Storyline In , the Uruguayan rugby team is flying to Chile to play a game.

Taglines: They were ordinary young men driven to the very limits of human endurance. Edit Did You Know? Trivia A script for this story was kicking around Hollywood from The subject matter of cannibalism and a schlocky Mexican adaptation Survive! Goofs In reality, the plane tail was ripped off by the torn-off right wing which had clipped a mountain peak before.

In the movie, it's the tail clipping a mountain peak and then being ripped off. Quotes Susana Parrado : [ the plane is over the Andes ] Oh, mama, look at the mountains! They're beautiful! Eugenia Parrado : Don't make me look at the mountains, Susana. The mountains look like big teeth. User Reviews Not like everyone else sees it 5 March by mrpreshow — See all my reviews. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Report this. Frequently Asked Questions Q: Is this movie based on a real story?

Knowing she will die of her injuries within a few days, he vows to set off on foot and find a way out of the mountains. When Carlitos reminds him that he will need food, Nando suggests eating the flesh of the deceased pilots to give him the strength to survive the journey to find help. Susana dies from her injuries.

The survivors listen to a radio for word of their rescue but are devastated to hear the search called off after nine days. After great debate, the starving passengers decide to eat the flesh of their dead relatives and friends. Zerbino, Rafael, and Juan Martino set off to search for the tail of the plane in hopes of finding batteries for the plane's radio to transmit their location. Among pieces of the wreckage, the teammates find additional corpses, but return to the group with news that the tail of the plane is likely a little farther away.

Later in the week, an avalanche strikes the plane and fills much of the interior with snow. Eight of the survivors are smothered by the snow or freeze to death. A second team, made up of Nando, Canessa, and Antonio "Tintin" Vizintin , sets out and find the tail of the plane.

Unable to bring the batteries to the fuselage, they return to the fuselage to get Roy, who is thought to have experience with electrical equipment. They bring him to the tail of the plane to see whether he can fix the radio. When Roy is unsuccessful, the team returns to the fuselage.

Federico and Alberto die from their injuries, as does Rafael, leading Nando to convince a reluctant Canessa to search for a way out of the mountains, taking Tintin with them. Two days into the journey, they send Tintin back to the fuselage so they can appropriate his rations and continue on their own.

After a day trek, the two escape the mountains and alert the authorities of their companions' location. As helicopters land on the mountain, the remaining 14 survivors celebrate. In the present, Carlitos describes how the survivors later returned to the site of the crash and buried the corpses under a pile of stones, marked with a cross.

The memorial to the 29 deceased and 16 survivors is shown. The names of the people who died in the disaster were changed for the film. Others, such as Ray Green, praised the tactful nature of the film stating that, "despite the potential for lurid sensationalism, Marshall manages to keep his and the film's dignity by steering an effectively downbeat course through some grim goings on thanks in no small manner to the almost allegorical ring of Stanley's stylized dialogue.

Roger Ebert wrote "There are some stories you simply can't tell. The story of the Andes survivors may be one of them. A companion documentary, Alive: 20 Years Later , was released at the same time as the film. It includes interviews with the survivors, as well as documentary footage of the rescue. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Theatrical release poster. Kathleen Kennedy Robert Watts.

Michael Kahn William Goldenberg. Release date. Running time. Michael Sicoly as the Pilot Col. Solana Fiona Roeske as Mrs. Rotten Tomatoes.

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Therefore, the bodies were either gibbeted at the common place of execution or at the scene of the crime. In the early part of the period under investigation here neither of these locations were typically urban centres. However, Chap. The second half of this chapter will investigate the potential impact the body in chains could have upon the condemned criminal and the spectator at the gibbet foot.

For the offender hung in chains the body was left to slowly rot in the gibbet cage in full public view. Like the punishment of dissection and public executions more broadly, it is not the intention to argue here that the corpse in chains acted as a successful deterrent to crime as this is almost impossible to accurately determine.

In addition, the fact people continued to commit heinous murders would suggest that it was not. However, the sight and smell of the gibbeted body was certainly intended as a stark example of the reward for crime to those who encountered it. In turn, from a reading of the available qualitative sources, this study will offer details of some of the outward responses to the gibbet in this period.

Through an analysis of the potential longevity of the punishment, this chapter will highlight cases where the bodies were stolen from their gibbets for various reasons, ranging from a desire to see them buried, to the offence their sight and smell caused to local inhabitants.

The final section of this chapter will provide an in-depth investigation into the case of James Stewart who was executed and hung in chains in His case occurred at a time when post-rebellion tensions were still evident in parts of Scotland and provides a stark example of the desire of the Scottish courts and the legal authorities in London to make a poignant spectacle of the criminal.

In addition, the gibbeting of his body embodied various themes that are presented here, namely the importance of location and potential threats to the security of the gibbet. Historically, the displaying of the criminal corpse was used as the final part of either an aggravated execution or a post-mortem punishment in the most atrocious criminal cases.

In Scotland, prior to the mid-eighteenth century, it was used for heinous murders. Hugo Arnot cited the case of Thomas Armstrong, tried for the murder of Sir John Carmichael, the warden of the west marches, as the first instance in Scotland of a malefactor hung in chains. Instead, in murder cases, the condemned were to be executed more swiftly but their bodies subject to post-mortem punishment.

While there was no single belief system regarding how far post-mortem punishments affected the dead body or the fate of the soul, there is evidence of concerns, in this chapter and others, regarding the disposal of criminal corpses. If a criminal was to be hung in chains, the body would be cut down from the scaffold after hanging for the usual time of between 30 and 60 minutes so that it could be hung up again inside the gibbet cage.

The words gallows and gibbet have often been used interchangeably to describe the apparatus on which the criminal was to be executed. However, this study refers to the gallows as the apparatus from which criminals were hanged by the neck during their execution, and the gibbet describes the structure used for the exposure of criminal corpses: an upright post with a projecting arm from which the cage would hang.

Tarlow has conducted an extensive search for surviving details of gibbets used in England in this period. She has demonstrated that gibbet cages were made for individual offenders as they were required. This appears to have also been the practice in Scotland as, in some cases, the bodies remained on display for several years making reuse impractical. In terms of the cost of gibbeting offenders, Tarlow demonstrated that it was potentially very expensive.

His body was stolen and buried at the gibbet foot but was discovered in with the cage relatively intact. It consisted of a ring around each ankle, from which a chain passed up each leg fastened to a band of strong iron hooped around the body. Four straps passed from the hoop, up the body, to a ring at the neck. The neck ring was attached to the head cap by four straps passing on each side of the head to meet at the top.

The assembly was attached to a strongly riveted swivel-link which allowed the contraption to rotate. The cage was then suspended from a two-foot chain and all the metalwork was made of iron. There were 22 men sentenced to the post-mortem punishment of hanging in chains between and the final gibbeting in Scotland in This was similarly the case when women were executed by strangulation and burning as opposed to being hung, drawn and quartered for treason.

Following the Murder Act they were exclusively sent for dissection. The Murder Act did not direct who was to be dissected and who was to be hung in chains and thus the decision was left in the hands of the judges. Therefore, this chapter will examine discernible explanations, based upon the circumstances surrounding the cases, why certain murderers were hung in chains in Scotland.

One contributory factor was the manner in which the murder was carried out. In six of the total 19 murder cases the men had murdered their wives. Nicol Brown had previously beaten his wife with a horsewhip to take her ring to sell. He would later kill her by throwing her into a fire.

Yet, these men were sent for dissection rather than being hung in chains. This attests to the discretionary implementation of postmortem punishment in Scotland. In addition to the method of killing used in the murders, a degree of importance can also be attached to the victim or the particular circumstances surrounding it. As discussed in Chap. He cut her throat in a botched robbery attempt and, despite an apparent lack of premeditation to murder, he was sentenced to have a hand severed and his body to be hung in chains.

When the constables attempted to take McIlroy, he drew a weapon and a struggle ensued. Kenneth had been passing and attempted to take the knife from McIlroy when he was stabbed. However, it was his resistance while being apprehended that led to a capital conviction and to his body being ordered to be hung in chains. A further factor that explained why an offender was sentenced to be hung in chains was if the murder was financially motivated.

In over half of the cases where the victim was not a family member, the murders had occurred with a property offence. This prompted the courts to use the gibbet as a reminder of the long arm of the law, especially in more remote areas. Her body was later found with marks of violence on the throat and chest with blood coming from her mouth. In addition, she had been stripped of her cloak, stockings, silver buckled shoes and all her possessions. However, other murders were committed with property offences that did not result in the offenders being hung in chains.

In addition, as discussed in Chap. This may explain why, after an initial concentration of hanging in chains in the s, the punishment of dissection was more favoured in the capital. An additional explanation can be found when providing an analysis of the locations where offenders were gibbeted. This chapter will argue that the gradual changes made to the locations of executions more generally was a crucial factor in the decline of gibbeting in practice decades before it was removed as a penal option by legislation.

Of the 22 men hung in chains in this period, only three were gibbeted for property offences. In comparison, research investigating gibbeting in England indicated that more offenders were hung in chains for property crimes, although not as many as for the crime of murder, and many of the cases were concentrated in the mid-eighteenth century.

The court heard how he was the captain of a notorious gang of robbers. Davidson, along with at least two accomplices who were not apprehended, forcibly entered the house of Robert Paton armed with broadswords and pistols, weapons that had been banned by legislation in the wake of the recent rebellion.

He was sentenced to be executed in Ruthrieston. The magistrates chose to erect the gibbet at the most convenient place near to the road leading to Aberdeen, perhaps to serve as a visible reminder to local residents as well as those travelling upon the public road. In Alexander MacIntosh was indicted at the circuit court for entering an association to rob coach passengers on the highway in Inverness. At least four other men were called to stand trial, all of whom failed to appear and were subsequently outlawed.

Prior to the beginning of the trial the Advocate Depute was informed that two principal prosecution witnesses had been kidnapped to prevent their attendance in court. It was strongly believed that Lady Borlum, the wife of one of the men outlawed, had orchestrated the abduction and a military party was required to retrieve the witnesses in time for the trial.

MacIntosh was convicted and sentenced to be executed at the common place in Inverness, situated very near to the Edinburgh Road, and his body hung in chains upon the same spot. The final property offender hung in chains following his execution was Kenneth Leal. He was convicted for assaulting and robbing year-old post boy John Smith between Elgin and Fochabers. Several letters were stolen, including one that contained 50 guineas. In England, 17 men were hung in chains between and for robbing the mail, usually at the scene of the crime.

The crimes, both believed to be atrocious in their own right, taken at the same time called for a stark example to be made in the area. Although a similar source does not appear to have survived for Scotland, or perhaps it is yet to be located, it is still possible to discern the role of the various legal authorities involved in shaping execution practices from other sources such as court records and newspapers.

It was the judges who decided upon the location of gibbeting, but the death sentence tasked sheriffs and magistrates with carrying out the actual executions and subsequent post-mortem punishments within their jurisdictions. In the case of Leal, the court had ordered that he be executed and hung in chains between Elgin and Fochabers, as it was on this road that he had committed the crime. However, the exact location was chosen by the magistrates. There was a concentration of cases between and the late s, with some evident links to ongoing attempts to establish control and sustained stability in parts of northern Scotland.

The concentrated use of the punishment between and correlates with the increase in executions more generally. However, there were only a handful of cases in the s and s before the punishment disappeared, apart from one particularly atrocious case in The chapter will now provide an analysis of the chronology of the punishment in Scotland, offering comparisons with its use in England.

It will then offer some potential explanations for its disappearance in practice by the late s, despite its remaining a penal option until As discussed in previous chapters, the mid-eighteenth century is an important period of investigation for historians of capital punishment in both Scotland and England.

The drivers behind the increased use of the death sentence north and south of the border are informative to a discussion of the punishment of hanging in chains. Rogers made the argument that the mid-eighteenth-century crime wave did not compromise the use of capital punishment in England.

Instead it gave rise to calls for more severity in its implementation. He highlighted that between and , forty criminals were hung in chains for the crimes of highway robbery, smuggling and murder in the southern counties of England, twice as many as in the previous four years combined. She highlighted cases where offenders were executed at Tyburn and other execution locations but gibbeted miles away in East Sussex due to its links with the activities of the gang.

Again, the geography of the punishment was important, as seven of the 14 cases occurred following trials before the Northern Circuit. Thus, the chronological pattern of gibbeting was broadly consistent with wider capital punishment practices in the mid-eighteenth century, as the Northern Circuit was also sending the most offenders to the scaffold in an evident determination to make stark and lasting examples of certain malefactors. However, as the eighteenth century progressed, there was less of a correlation between the use of gibbeting and periods of increased capital punishment levels.

Following a concentration of gibbeting in the late s and s, three of the remaining cases occurred in the s, four in the s and one final case in In terms of comparing the use of the punishment north and south of the border, Tarlow highlighted that in England and Wales, of offenders capitally convicted under the terms of the Murder Act, were hung in chains.

Of the remaining cases that made up the total 22 in Scotland, six murders had occurred prior to and three offenders were gibbeted for property offences. However, the chronology of hanging in chains in Scotland needs to be examined further. Despite occupying a similarly central role in the criminal justice system as dissection in the two decades following , gibbeting disappeared in Scotland after , apart from one isolated case in Comparatively, although gibbeting in England was used to a lesser extent than dissection, the collapse of the punishment south of the border occurred later, in the early nineteenth century.

The chapter will now provide an in-depth examination of the final gibbeting in before offering some explanations for the disappearance of the punishment in practice. Her mangled body was found concealed in the nearby woods. Gillan was to be executed on the moor, near to where the body had been found, and hung in chains on the same spot. Although his crime stood out for its atrocity, what is crucial to our understanding of why the courts ordered that his body be hung in chains is its correlation with the increased use of crime scene executions in the first third of the nineteenth century.

The reintroduction of crime scene executions, which had been used sporadically following a concentration of cases in the mid-eighteenth century, and the remote location Gillan had chosen for the perpetration of his offence offered a suitable location for the gibbeting of a criminal corpse. Both were crucial factors in the decision-making process. The court was not only willing to forgo the concerns that had previously prevented the use of hanging in chains, they were also willing to pay the additional costs of having the gibbet and the iron cage in which the body would be encased custom-made to provide a stark reminder of the reward for murder.

By the last decades of the eighteenth century, hanging in chains increasingly came to be viewed as an unsuitable penal option in Scotland. Even in the most atrocious cases, where previously the punishment would likely have been gibbeting rather than dissection, the judges had refrained from using this sentence due to a belief that it was potentially harmful, and thus counter-productive, to the public good.

There were notable examples when the punishment appeared to have been considered by the courts but was not sentenced due to both practical and ideological concerns. On the night of the murder the deceased had been informed that there were two men on his lands who were suspected to be poaching.

He rode along the sands and came upon Campbell. He demanded that Campbell give up his gun but Campbell had refused, stating that he was an excise officer looking for smugglers in the area. The Earl then went to get his own gun before advancing upon him. Campbell told the court that, as he was backing away, he tripped over a stone and his gun went off, mortally wounding the Earl.

However, the status of the victim, in large part, swayed the decision against him. The fact that the judge did not want to hang his body in chains demonstrates a belief at the time that, of the two available post-mortem punishments, hanging in chains was the harsher and was to be reverted to only in the most atrocious cases.

In England, the last instances of hanging in chains occurred in When addressing the court following the conviction of McDonald and Black for a heinous murder committed just outside Edinburgh in , the judges expressed at length their abhorrence for the nature of the crime. Although the practice of gibbeting did not stop completely, the council decided to relocate the standing gallows, which was also used for the exposure of criminal corpses, away from the Utrecht main road.

Following the conviction of William Burke in , the Lord Justice Clerk, David Boyle, stated that the only doubt in his mind was, whether to satisfy the violated laws of the country and the voice of public indignation, his body ought to be exhibited in chains.

Again, this attitude was perhaps reflective of a wider ideological shift in attitudes towards public and punitive bodily display. However, this must be measured alongside the more practical and logistical considerations that impacted upon the disappearance of the gibbeted body in Scotland. This provides a contrast to practices in England where executions could occur in one location but the bodies could be gibbeted in another, which may have been spatially specific due to the crimes committed.

Therefore, in Scotland, the implementation of gibbeting was more explicitly linked to the public execution and, crucially, to the changes that occurred to its location as this period progressed. Taking into consideration the chronology of hanging in chains, this chapter will now turn to question how far the decline, and eventual end, of the punishment correlated with changes made to the locations of executions more generally, namely their gradual move to more central urban areas which were perhaps unsuitable places to gibbet dead bodies.

However, the four men sentenced to be hung in chains following trials before the High Court in Edinburgh between and were instead executed at the Gallowlee between Edinburgh and Leith. An history of the town cited the existence of a permanent gibbet at the site. Prior to the mid-eighteenth century, it appears to have been used predominantly for hanging bodies in chains rather than executions. However, his body was taken to be hung in chains at the Gallowlee. There had also been a shift in practice, perhaps due to an acknowledgement that it was more expedient to also conduct the executions there following a procession from the place of confinement in Edinburgh.

In demonstrating adaptations to the staging of public executions in this period, Chap. When investigating both the chronology of gibbeting and the location chosen for it in various parts of Scotland, it becomes apparent that gibbet sites were not within city centres.

In terms of the exposure of criminal corpses outside the town walls, Spierenburg argued that this added to the dread experienced by the condemned as their body was to be eternally banished. In the remaining cases the condemned were to be executed between Edinburgh and Leith, if tried in Edinburgh, or at the common place of the circuit city. The common place of execution in Perth was upon the permanent gallows situated on the Burgh Muir to the west of the town.

Executions persisted there until they were moved to the High Street in the s. Incidentally, the cases of the five men hung in chains at the common place in Perth occurred between and , prior to the move. Similarly, in Aberdeen, two men were hung in chains at Gallows Hill in and respectively.

The latter, Alexander Morison, would be the last criminal executed there before the common place was relocated to the more central location of Castle Street. A comparable pattern is discernible when chronicling the punishment in other cities such as Ayr, Inverness and Glasgow.

The post-mortem punishment of the body was intended to add a further degree of infamy to the sentence of death for both the condemned and the spectator. Wonderfully researched and written! Rating : 5 out of 5 stars This book literally does what it says on the tin! It's a well researched, comprehensive look at the history of gibbeting. I love the idea of a book looking at a specific type of punishment and the crimes that fit them through the history of its use.

I'd love to read a book just like this one on the guillotine as well! Well written, with a good pace and fascinating stories, this was a truly excellent book about a familiar, and yet surprisingly not well-known form of punishment and execution. A very interesting piece of history! I had never heard of this word or punishment before, so I found this a really interesting, yet horrifying read.

Filled with lots of information and details, this is the perfect read for any history lovers. I love that it also featured some pictures at the end of the book. I wonder what crimes Rating : 5 out of 5 stars Gibbeting has been portrayed in movies and books, often with a more "romantic" view of what their original intent was. The true history of what these gibbets represented was much more brutal, a deterrent for those who were thinking about committing crimes.

For a while, gibbeting was popular, giving the community a sense of justice being served, while punishing the perpetrator with the lack of a decent burial. But as with most sensations, this one eventually burned out, This book gives a great background of the rise and decline of gibbeting, the many different crimes, perpetrators and the reasons or lack thereof for the crime being committed.

I loved this book, and it was fascinating to read the many different accounts and try to figure out why the judges would sometimes order the gibbeting of the condemned. Highly recommended! Fabulous read and engaging! I also greatly appreciated the nearly pages of illustrations and photographs at the end, which included drawings or photos of actual gibbets, preserved sites, letters, flyers, and other associated artifacts Samantha is a writer based in Sheffield, England.

She lives in north Sheffield with her partner, two daughters, two dogs and one cat. Products Authors Categories Series. Toggle navigation. All By Date Books All Reference Books Politics. Latest Releases Coming Soon Blog. Your basket is empty. Add to Basket. Add to Wishlist. What's this? Need a currency converter? Check XE. Price The History of Gibbeting ePub NetGalley, Cristie Underwood Robert Bartlett This fascinating book about The history of gibbeting may also have been subtitled, "Everything you wanted to know about gibbeting but were too afraid to ask.

Read the full review here GoodReads, Robert Neil Smith Rating : 5 out of 5 stars What can you say about a book about hanging bodies for display? NetGalley, Zoe Pollock This was a small book but it was a very informative and well planned out book which I got a lot out of and learnt a lot about the subject. UK Historian 'Harsh crimes and punishment' Sheffield Telegraph, 19th March I have to say that I was not aware that gibbeting involved metal cages, nor how society clamoured for post-mortems on gibbeted victims.

Books Monthly Rating : 5 out of 5 stars I had been really looking forward to reading this book, I think it is my fascination with true crime and also a little bit of the macabre combined with a strong interest in what used to happen in the past. NetGalley, Donna Maguire Rating : 5 out of 5 stars A fascinating and informative read on the punishment Gibbeting, a form of history that has not been widely covered. NetGalley, Georgi D Rating : 5 out of 5 stars Gibbeting has been portrayed in movies and books, often with a more "romantic" view of what their original intent was.

NetGalley, Bill Capossere. Her Life, Loves and Impact Katey Dickens was born into a house of turbulent celebrity and grew up surrounded by fascinating, famous, and infamous people. Available in the following formats: Kindle Hardback ePub. Available in the following formats: Paperback ePub Kindle.

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With the invention of the cannon came this wonderfully imaginative way of executing enemy combatants. The basic method was to tie the unfortunate victim to the barrel of a cannon and fire it. Horrific as this sounds I imagine it was pretty quick. Here is a description from the time:.

It was carried out by many of the European colonial nations from the 16th century but it is the British who took to most enthusiastically. It was used in India during the rebellion against both mutineers and deserters. Gibbeting was the act of encasing the victim in a metal cage hung from the arm of a gallow.

It was used for two reasons; firstly to display the rotting mutilated bodies of executed criminals to serve as a warning or in other cases as the actual method of execution. The prisoner would die from either thirst, exposure or not being able to scratch an annoying itch somewhere. It seems that using it as an actual method of putting to death was phased out in Britain in the s. Not sure why, obviously not for humanitarian reasons. It continued to be used for displaying bodies into the s and was apparently very popular as a family day out, although it is believed local residents were less in favour.

It is reported that as late as the s gibbeting was used in that bastion of civilisation, Afghanistan, to execute goat rustlers and the likes. Whilst not the most painful method on the list this one fills me with abject terror. The Romans were also fond of this method, not only reserving it for their enemies, but famously for any Vestal Virgin who failed to maintain her vow of celibacy. In these cases it was a classic example of ancient justice; if she was innocent the god Vesta would rescue her; if not….

OK, so that was in ancient times. Everyone was a bit barbaric in those days. However, what is truly shocking is examples in modern times with the usual culprits featuring heavily. The Nazis, Khmer Rouge and Maoist Chinese all carried out live burials, but it was the Japanese who really excelled themselves.

As part of their string of war crimes committed in the Nanking Massacre Chinese prisoners were buried alive. Another extremely popular method of killing with the ancients was throwing to the animals. This form of execution could take many forms and really did encourage some imaginative thinking.

The first method was probably just a pit with some vicious animals in. Dogs, wolves or maybe something a little more exotic such as snakes have been suggested. Of course it is the Romans who took this to the next level and turned it into a spectator sport.

Early Christians were the victims of choice and lions the beast of choice. However, more exotic animals such as crocodiles, hyenas and bears were also introduced. Perhaps the most perverse and disturbing form of animal induced death was scaphism. This basically involves force feeding and covering the victim in honey, then leaving them staked out to be devoured or stung to death by insects.

Anyone who has burnt their finger in the kitchen will know how much this hurts. Obviously a similar experience set ancient minds racing and asking themselves how can we turn this into an excruciating form of death? Obviously the first method employed was a variation on the kebab with the victim burnt at the stake. A more refined method of cooking was good old fashioned boiling alive.

Methods varied and it was possible to either be put in the cauldron as it was heated or alternatively dunked into already boiling water. Not sure which was worse but another alternative was having the executioner dip the victim in and out to maximise the ordeal. A particularly imaginative version involved heating oil in a shallow container — yes, like an enormous frying pan.

The bull was a hollow bronze statue with a door in the side. Once the condemned was placed inside the bull a fire would be lit underneath effectively roasting them. Another English speciality was the three staged spectacle of hanging, drawing and quartering. This was reserved for the most serious of crimes, high treason, and was considered the very pinnacle of execution in the Middle Ages.

The process began with the prisoner being placed on a wooden frame and dragged through the streets to the place of execution. On arrival they would be placed on the gallows and hung until close to death. Now comes the nice part. Whilst still alive they would be cut open and disembowelled, often have their private parts cut off and then be beheaded. Now they were quartered, i. If you were unlucky you may have got to watch some of your co-conspirators being executed in this manner before it was your turn.

In some cases it is reported that the victims lived long enough to see their entrails drawn out and burned. The last time this sentence was passed was in Now flaying is not your run of the mill method of execution. This sadistic form of killing involving skinning the victim alive was only enacted by the most deranged and bloodthirsty of regimes.

One lot that fitted this bill were the ancient Assyrians, allegedly one of the first civilisations. Often reserved for rebel leaders the unfortunate victim would have their skin nailed to the city walls as warning to anyone else with ideas above their station. A particularly pleasant twist was the practice of flaying young children in front of their parents.

Flaying also appears to have been popular with the Aztecs as part of their ritualistic blood lust, although they generally waited until after death. Skinning seems to have made a bit of a comeback in the 14th century China. One emperor in particular is said to have ordered the flaying of 5, women. Being torn limb from limb, or quartering, was another popular method of execution with a long history.

It involves the condemned being attached to more than one moveable object which will then depart in opposite directions tearing the person apart in the process. In its classic form this generally involved the person being chained to four horses which then set off in opposite directions. After great debate, the starving passengers decide to eat the flesh of their dead relatives and friends.

Zerbino, Rafael, and Juan Martino set off to search for the tail of the plane in hopes of finding batteries for the plane's radio to transmit their location. Among pieces of the wreckage, the teammates find additional corpses, but return to the group with news that the tail of the plane is likely a little farther away.

Later in the week, an avalanche strikes the plane and fills much of the interior with snow. Eight of the survivors are smothered by the snow or freeze to death. A second team, made up of Nando, Canessa, and Antonio "Tintin" Vizintin , sets out and find the tail of the plane. Unable to bring the batteries to the fuselage, they return to the fuselage to get Roy, who is thought to have experience with electrical equipment.

They bring him to the tail of the plane to see whether he can fix the radio. When Roy is unsuccessful, the team returns to the fuselage. Federico and Alberto die from their injuries, as does Rafael, leading Nando to convince a reluctant Canessa to search for a way out of the mountains, taking Tintin with them.

Two days into the journey, they send Tintin back to the fuselage so they can appropriate his rations and continue on their own. After a day trek, the two escape the mountains and alert the authorities of their companions' location. As helicopters land on the mountain, the remaining 14 survivors celebrate. In the present, Carlitos describes how the survivors later returned to the site of the crash and buried the corpses under a pile of stones, marked with a cross.

The memorial to the 29 deceased and 16 survivors is shown. The names of the people who died in the disaster were changed for the film. Others, such as Ray Green, praised the tactful nature of the film stating that, "despite the potential for lurid sensationalism, Marshall manages to keep his and the film's dignity by steering an effectively downbeat course through some grim goings on thanks in no small manner to the almost allegorical ring of Stanley's stylized dialogue.

Roger Ebert wrote "There are some stories you simply can't tell. The story of the Andes survivors may be one of them. A companion documentary, Alive: 20 Years Later , was released at the same time as the film. It includes interviews with the survivors, as well as documentary footage of the rescue. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Theatrical release poster.

Kathleen Kennedy Robert Watts. Michael Kahn William Goldenberg. Release date. Running time. Michael Sicoly as the Pilot Col. Solana Fiona Roeske as Mrs. Rotten Tomatoes. Retrieved Chicago Sun-Times. Retrieved June 17, Box Office Mojo.